Stella Metsovas: Increase Longevity and Vitality Through Food http://stellametsovas.com Top Nutritionist Shares Mediterranean Diet Recipes and Lifestyle Programs for Optimal Digestive Health Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:28:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Village Style: Greek Lemon Chicken Soup (VIDEO)http://stellametsovas.com/village-style-greek-lemon-chicken-soup-video/ http://stellametsovas.com/village-style-greek-lemon-chicken-soup-video/#comments Fri, 10 Oct 2014 22:20:42 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5169 Hello!  Today, I’m bringing you one of my favorite soups from the villages of Greece. It’s a Greek cream of chicken soup with lemon and egg. It’s actually called Avgolemeno and what that means is, avgo which means “egg,” lemeno or “lemon,” and then, a consomme.  So, it’s this beautiful broth that is technically the […]

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Hello!  Today, I’m bringing you one of my favorite soups from the villages of Greece.

It’s a Greek cream of chicken soup with lemon and egg. It’s actually called Avgolemeno and what that means is, avgo which means “egg,” lemeno or “lemon,” and then, a consomme.  So, it’s this beautiful broth that is technically the version of chicken soup, but it’s really a Greek-style chicken soup; every Greek I know has some sort of variation with the lemon.

My grandmother would add tons of lemon when we would get sick because she believed the lemon and the broth was essential to keeping your digestive tract nice and healthy. She believed if you got sick, it was attributed to your digestive tract, interesting.

 

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/video_12339132_greek-cream-chicken-rice-soup-recipe.html

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Details Magazinehttp://stellametsovas.com/details-magazine/ http://stellametsovas.com/details-magazine/#comments Mon, 06 Oct 2014 16:30:41 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5161 The Best Way to Lose Weight Is Already in Your Kitchen You may think you know their benefits, but the probiotics found in yogurt and ginger beer and added to your cold-press are actually the new secret to shedding pounds. Skeptics warn that more research is needed to find out which strains do what. Plus, […]

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The Best Way to Lose Weight Is Already in Your Kitchen

You may think you know their benefits, but the probiotics found in yogurt and ginger beer and added to your cold-press are actually the new secret to shedding pounds.

Stella Metsovas Featured in Details MagazineSkeptics warn that more research is needed to find out which strains do what. Plus, probiotics aren’t regulated by the FDA, meaning manufacturers can make vague claims without backup. Still, the anecdotal evidence is persuasive. Stella Metsovas, a certified nutritionist and author of The 21-Day Digestive Health Detox, prescribed a half-cup of probiotic-rich foods daily to a group of clients, who lost an average of 21 pounds over six months without cutting calories. “The right types of probiotics can absolutely improve metabolism and help with weight loss,” Kellman says.

Read complete article by clicking here.

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Could Artificial Sweeteners Make You Fat?http://stellametsovas.com/artificial-sweeteners-make-fat/ http://stellametsovas.com/artificial-sweeteners-make-fat/#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 15:44:53 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5139 Stella Quoted in Shape Magazine (January 2012): “I’m against artificially sweetened anything. Artificial sweeteners have been shown to disrupt beneficial bacteria in your gut, and optimal digestion and absorption of nutrients begins in a healthy gut,” Metsovas says.   Many of us have seen the food pyramid—the original guide to balanced eating. You know, the […]

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Stella Quoted in Shape Magazine (January 2012):

“I’m against artificially sweetened anything. Artificial sweeteners have been shown to disrupt beneficial bacteria in your gut, and optimal digestion and absorption of nutrients begins in a healthy gut,” Metsovas says.  

Artificial Sweeteners and gut bacteria.

Many of us have seen the food pyramid—the original guide to balanced eating. You know, the one that has lauded the benefits of fruits, veggies and grains and vilified “sugars”—after all, sugars are reserved for the very tip of the structure and thus, we are told, should make up a very small part of our diet (here’s more on that here).

This makes sense; refined sugars are addictive and linked to obesity, cardiovascular disease, macular degeneration, and tooth decay. They’re also considered one of my “Foul Four” foods to be avoided!

This societal distaste for refined sugar has led to a desire for something sweet, without the calories.  Out of these desires the artificial sweetener was born—a non-caloric “healthy” alternative. Added into everything en masse (remember the 1990’s fat free craze?), these alternatives have become the most widely used food additives worldwide, and it’s considered the better option for lean and obese individuals alike. But is it really beneficial, or is that all just hype? 

Even worse, could they actually be doing more harm than good?

The Not so Sweet Truth: 

It turns out that non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS for short) could very well be a wolf in sheep’s clothing.  In fact, years ago, one of the first dietary changes I would make with clients was to remove NAS completely for their diet–even removing gum from their diet. 

The new controversy of the moment has shown a direct association between NAS consumption, weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Straightforward? Hardly. NAS, it turns out, tends to be consumed by those individuals who are already suffering from metabolic syndrome manifestations. Thus, it’s the chicken and the egg conundrum: what came first, the sweetener or the disease?  

While researchers may not have the answer to the aforementioned conundrum yet (although I have my 2-cents), they do know the real problem with NAS consumption. Most NAS passes through our GI tract without being digested, by us anyway. We rely on the natural microbiotic community we host in our intestines to do the dirty work. 

Everyone has a microbiotic community (the flora in your gut), and they’re responsible for regulating multiple physiological processes. What strains of bacteria your microbiome consists of is modulated by your diet and alterations to it have been associated with a propensity for metabolic syndromes like diabetes.  Did you know that one bad day of eating processed foods can alter the internal ecosystem of your gut?

What does this have to do with eating NAS? Well, its ingestion alters your microbiota. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel found that feeding Sucralose, saccharin and aspartame to mice left their specimens with “marked glucose intolerance”.  

Sidenote: While it’s true that human studies are always the most treasured in research, we cannot deny the examinations provided here in this study. 

The researchers concluded: “NAS promote metabolic derangements in…diets paralleling human conditions, in both the lean and obese state”.  

Microbiota: Key Player or Bystander?

NAS consumption, the researchers found that ingesting saccharin leads to a microbial imbalance (an increase in strains from the Bacteroidetes phylum and a decrease in strains from the Firmicutes to be exact) that increases our glucose intolerance.

*My recent conference with Genova Diagnostics on gut health characterized Bacteroidetes as the “fat” bugs and Firmicutes as the “thin” bugs.

Of Mice and Men:

At this point you may be wondering what studies on mice eating human like diets has to do with you. Well, those Israeli researchers wondered the same thing. They looked at the differences between long-term NAS consumers and non-diabetic individuals.

The clinical results: long term NAS consumption was positively correlated with increased weight, higher fasting blood glucose and the elevation of an enzyme that is a warning sign of liver damage not associated with alcoholism (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease).

They then took 7 non-NAS consumers and provided them with the maximum allowable daily intake for a week. Despite the short exposure period, they developed “significantly poorer glycemic responses”. 

So What?

All those poor responses and glucose intolerance are signs of the onset of diabetes mellitus type 2. The onset of this condition is preventable. In fact, it’s an “intestinal illness” or what I call the “undercover digestive ailment”. 

The Verdict:

Over a century ago we tried to replace sugar in our lives, hoping it would lead us down a healthier path. However, a growing body of scientific literature is starting to prove otherwise—non-caloric sweeteners, if nothing else, aren’t what they’re cracked up to be! If you want to live a truly sweet life, it’s time to cut the NAS out of your diet; your GI tract will thank you for it. 

 

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THE FALL TABLE: GLAZED PARSNIP AND SWEET POTATOhttp://stellametsovas.com/the-fall-table-glazed-parsnip-and-sweet-potato/ http://stellametsovas.com/the-fall-table-glazed-parsnip-and-sweet-potato/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 00:22:59 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=2520                           Parsnips are packed with nutrients, making this dish a super healthy addition to your fall table! INGREDIENTS 2 parsnips 1 tablespoon brown rice syrup 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 Japanese sweet potato 1 tablespoon coconut oil Salt and pepper to season Olive […]

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PARSNIPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parsnips are packed with nutrients, making this dish a super healthy addition to your fall table!

INGREDIENTS
2 parsnips
1 tablespoon brown rice syrup
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 Japanese sweet potato
1 tablespoon coconut oil
Salt and pepper to season
Olive oil to dress the dish
Fresh sage as garnish (optional)

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Wash and scrub the parsnips and sweet potato; dice both and place in mixing bowl. Add the brown rice syrup, mustard, coconut oil, sea salt and pepper to the mixing bowl and evenly coat the parsnips and sweet potato.
Spread the parsnips and sweet potato evenly across a baking tray.
Bake at 375 degrees F for approximately 30 minutes, or until cooked. Dress with fresh olive oil and sage.

TIPS
You can substitute the brown rice sugar with maple syrup.

NUTRITIONAL INFO
Serving size: 1/4 bowl
Total servings: 4
Calories: 154
Total fat: 7.4g
Saturated fat: 3.1g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Total carbohydrate: 21.8g
Dietary fiber: 3.5g
Sugars: 12.5g
Protein: 1.5g
NUTRITIONAL PERCENTAGES
Fat 19%
Carbohydrate 56%
Protein 3%

Recipe prepared by Stella Metsovas B.S. for  http://www.completenutrition.com/foodie-fix

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SPROUTED WHEAT TORTILLAS PIZZA RECIPEhttp://stellametsovas.com/sprouted-wheat-tortillas-pizza/ http://stellametsovas.com/sprouted-wheat-tortillas-pizza/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 01:33:39 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=2549                           Sprouted Wheat Tortillas Pizza Recipe Start to finish: 25 minutes Servings: 2 Skill: Easy Things Needed 1 sprouted wheat tortilla 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 medium tomato 1/2 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese 8 (30g) California olives (black) 2 teaspoons dried oregano […]

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SPROUTED PIZZA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouted Wheat Tortillas Pizza Recipe

Start to finish: 25 minutes

Servings: 2
Skill: Easy

Things Needed
1 sprouted wheat tortilla
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 medium tomato
1/2 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
8 (30g) California olives (black)
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon sea salt

Directions
Step 1
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Step 2
Lightly oil a pizza baking stone. Place the sprouted wheat tortilla in the middle.

Step 3
Mix the tomato paste and 1 teaspoon of oregano in a small bowl. Add a tablespoon of water to create a smooth paste. You might need to add more than 1 tablespoon of water to loosen the consistency of the paste. Cover the top of tortilla with the tomato paste.

Step 4
Top the tomato paste with half of the mozzarella cheese. Slice the fresh tomato thin and arrange neatly around the tortilla. Top with olives and the remaining portion of the mozzarella cheese.

Step 5
Bake at 350 degrees F for approximately 15 minutes, or until cheese has melted.

Step 6
Top with remaining dried oregano and serve immediately.

Nutritional Data
1 serving = 2 slices or 1/2 pizza
Calories: 220
Total fat: 10g
Saturated fat: 4g
Cholesterol: 20mg
Sodium: 1200mg
Total carbohydrate: 21g
Dietary fiber: 5g
Sugars: 2g
Protein: 11g

RECIPE BY STELLA METSOVAS B.S. FOR COMPLETE NUTRITION  http://www.completenutrition.com/foodie-fix

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Daily Digestion: The Challenges behind Carbohydrateshttp://stellametsovas.com/daily-digestion-challenges-behind-carbohydrates-2/ http://stellametsovas.com/daily-digestion-challenges-behind-carbohydrates-2/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 18:00:38 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=4632 It’s been the talk of the town for quite some time: low carbohydrate and weight loss. A recent study from the American College of Physicians tested obese people with a low-carb diet and found restricting “carbohydrates” is more beneficial than a low-fat diet for losing weight. I have a few opinions (and probably more than a few!) […]

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It’s been the talk of the town for quite some time: low carbohydrate and weight loss.

Low Carb Diet and Weight Loss

A recent study from the American College of Physicians tested obese people with a low-carb diet and found restricting “carbohydrates” is more beneficial than a low-fat diet for losing weight.

I have a few opinions (and probably more than a few!) regarding clinical studies who take otherwise unhealthy people and make them better by restricting ‘X’ (in this case, carbohydrates).

  1.  When the media gets ahold of scientific studies they tend to exploit the study causing confusions (in this case) around healthy versus unhealthy carbs.  The public becomes fearful of all things carbs, restricts, then binges back into their carb-party.
  2.  What did the subjects consume for X amount of years to become obese–clearly, not all carbohydrates are created equally.  Research is now showing that even your great grandparents have a say on how your genes showcase your health.
  3.  Why aren’t longevity studies of rural villages throughout the world being discussed?  Shouldn’t we use time-tested information on humans, health and longevity to guide us?

The fact remains: 95% of your health depends on your diet, and the source of carbohydrates can make or break your attempts at losing weight, keeping the weight off, and becoming lean.

In this article, I’m going to address starch metabolism and digestion–a key player in creating a common denominator for these low-carb studies and your deck of cards (aka, your DNA).  Please try and read through the complete article, I’ve really tried to tone down the biochemistry 101 lingo.

Digestion and Carbohydrates 

Digestion isn’t equal—in the land of nutrients not all are the same.

Carbohydrates can be particularly pesky—and it’s their cumbersome nature that may be behind the increase in global obesity. Each of us carries at least one AMY1 gene, which allows us to digest foodstuffs high in starch (think carbs). The original school of thought preached that we each carried 2 copies of the gene; research has recently found that number to be highly variable however.

AMY1 is responsible for allowing us to produce a salivary enzyme known as amylase: a key player in starch digestion. As our meals have shifted towards starch heavy fair, we’ve selected for a more copies—but not all of us have hopped on the genetic bandwagon.

Amylase is only one enzyme, AMY1 only one gene, what does it matter if you’re only carrying 1 copy?

Well, researchers at Imperial College London looked at the gene variables of citizens from Singapore, Sweden, France and the UK. They found that the fewer copies you had, the higher your risk of obesity.

In fact, a person with less than 4 copies of the gene was 8 times more likely to be obese than their counterparts with 9 copies or more. With each additional copy, a person’s chances of becoming obese decreased by 20%. Those with fewer copies also tended to be glucose resistant, so the gene’s presence (or lack thereof) may also be connected to the onset of other metabolic disorders like diabetes. This then, is one instance where more really is better.

Genetics, Amylase and Carbohydrates 

So what the heck is going on here?  Does the genetic card you’re holding get worse and worse throughout generations?  Do the genes get fired on with modern implications like processed carbohydrates (leave potatoes and rice out of this!), sedentary behavior, leaky gut, and so on?

While genetics can be an excellent predictor of the shape that we’ll find ourselves in, it certainly isn’t the be-all-end-all determining factor of our health and well-being.

Food is important, not just what we put into our bodies but what our mothers put into them as well. It turns out pregnant women’s diets have epigenetic effects on their offspring—meaning how they eat can cause heritable changes to your DNA structure.

If a mother happens to create a hyperglycemic environment during pregnancy by consuming processed foods and sugars, the environment in utero has a pronounced effect on the child’s “adiposity and metabolism”, according to Dr. Toni I. Pollin of the American Diabetes Association.

Don’t worry!  My mother had an addiction to chocolate mousse while pregnant with me and gained over 60-pounds. There was, in fact, a way for me to switch off my ‘chocolate mousse genes’ and live, what my doctor calls, the pillar of health. *P.S., mom was okay with me discussing her sweet addiction!

His research found that maternal nutrition could trigger a fetal epigenetic event that led to an increased chance of obesity and the onset of metabolic syndromes like diabetes.  The good doctor concluded that the findings bolstered the idea that nutritional counseling during pregnancy was far more important than previously thought. Malnutrition has an effect too.

In my article “Good Parenting at the Genetic Level: How your Diet effects your Family” I mention that famine in the Netherlands caused people born during the period to have a lifetime’s worth of health problems—all because their mothers didn’t have access to adequate nutrition while pregnant.

The good news about an epigenetic effect? Unlike changes to the sequence of your DNA they can be changed or reversed under certain conditions or in certain environments.  You can come back from the bad genetic cards you’ve been dealt—with proper nutrition.  See, I told you!

Reducing or eliminating your processed foods (especially if you suspect that you may be in short supply of the AMY1 gene) is one step of the Paleo-Mediterranean diet you can adopt.

Digestive Health 101 

Gut health is also key. As I noted before in my article “Gut Bacteria: The Unsung Hero”, there are specific strains of bacteria that aid in the digestion of carbohydrates—if we eat to cultivate their proliferation. “Simplified gut flora”—or flora we cultivate by eating large amounts of processed foods—has also been linked to obesity. If you think your cards are stacked against you, eating diversely and healthfully can aid in counteracting your chances of gaining weight in more ways than you originally assumed. To kick start gut bacterial diversity, I recommend imbibing probiotics or fermented veggies (think kimchi) to introduce new strains holistically—once there you can upkeep them by eating a variety of simple, healthful one-ingredient foods.

Or, you can take my Digestive Health Detox protocol I’ve been using successfully for over 10-years in private practice to see just how sensitive you are to starch and sugar based carbohydrates.

21 Day Digestive Detox

The power of gut bacteria is incredible—as such it’s time we bulk up those strains! To do so we need to stop focusing on calorie restriction and start focusing on what we’re actually bothering to chow down on. As I mentioned before probiotic is the way to go (and not the powder, whole foods are best); it can be as simple as eating more yogurt or trying sauerkraut (or the aforementioned kimchi!).

Genetics are important, there’s no bones about it—but they don’t have to be some harbinger of metabolic doom. You can take your phenotypic destiny and alter it; there are a variety of ways to go about this.

Finally, as a diet for a lifetime, my Paleo-Mediterranean approach takes the best of several worlds and melds them together for optimal gut health, and ultimately, optimal overall health. It’s often said that “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”—ancestral eating like the Paleo and Mediterranean diet is time tested and time approved, so if you are what you eat—eat well and be well, just like your ancestors and their diet intended!

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Greece: Resilience and the Art of Bouncing Backhttp://stellametsovas.com/greece-resilience-art-bouncing-back/ http://stellametsovas.com/greece-resilience-art-bouncing-back/#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 14:52:56 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5088 Greece has been facing a lengthy 6-year recession, and is the country with the highest unemployment rate in the entire EU—according to the European Union’s Eurostat database. Despite this, the Greeks have been making a comeback and are as resilient as ever. As a proud Greek-American, with a soft spot for how they’re managing a […]

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Greece has been facing a lengthy 6-year recession, and is the country with the highest unemployment rate in the entire EU—according to the European Union’s Eurostat database. Despite this, the Greeks have been making a comeback and are as resilient as ever. As a proud Greek-American, with a soft spot for how they’re managing a “come back” I’ve provided a clear-cut explanation of the situation in Greece below.

The Current Economic Situation:

Eurostat has been assessing the state of the European Union economy and recently released their 2014 report. As of March Greece has the highest unemployment rate in the EU at 26.8%–followed closely by Spain. Even more alarming is their unemployment rate among young adults (25 and under)—at 57.7%.

The country’s state isn’t without silver linings however. The Global Competitiveness Report released by the World Economic Forum revealed this year that Greece has moved up to 91/148 countries—increasing their global competitive edge. The report notes that “Greece has started to show improvements in a number of other areas….Slight improvements are seen in the country’s institutional environment, the efficiency of its labor markets, and technological adoption.” Furthermore the report states that Greece has a number of strengths it can monopolize on; including a “reasonably well educated workforce that is adept at adopting new technologies.” At the moment, they just need access to financing. Financing may eventually become available: the Bank of Greece expects the economy to expand by 0.5% and finally break through the 6 year recession.

The Growing “Fix”

The path to a potential boom is being led by the young adults with the excellent education and ability to adapt—the good they’re peddling: the classic Mediterranean diet; with great success. They’re taking their passion for their ancient way of eating and sharing it with the world.

To witness this passion one need only to look at Athinagoras Kostakos who may only be 30 years old but he’s cooking like an old soul: Kostakos’s culinary home at Bill and Coo Hotel, Mykonos, Greece, uses local recipes, ingredients and folklore to provide culinary treats with ancient roots. He may well become Greece’s version of France’s Paul Bocuse—the man responsible for bringing a “nouvelle” twist to “classique” cuisine.

Athinagoras Kostaskos Bill and Coo

Of his Chef—and the current state of affairs—General Manager of the Bill and Coo Hotel, Panagiotis Sopiadis puts it succinctly: “It is during the difficult times that we appreciate and respect our tools and efforts. Greece as a brand name is stronger than ever and it is our responsibility to keep it this way providing our best characteristics hospitality and culinary services.” Kostakos is not alone in his pride—young Greek entrepreneurs throughout the country are finding ways to export Greek staples. With innovative young chefs and entrepreneurs on the rise, it’s easy to see Greece’s future is bright. Products from the likes of Mario Batali and Gordon Ramsey (other foreign super chefs) are popular around the world and so are the types of food they tout.

The United States (among other regions) is receptive to this dietary “exportation”: Dr. Artemis Simopoulos author of “The Omega Diet” led a culinary team to Capitol Hill in 2013 to extol the virtues of the Mediterranean diet in correlation with the “Let’s Move!” program started by Michelle Obama.

The event was planned by the Hellenic Caucus with the aim to raise awareness about of the myriad health benefits of the traditional Greek diet and strengthen and promote the exportation and trade of all the healthy food products these young super stars are providing. One of the attending chefs noted “This event will show that eating healthier doesn’t mean sacrificing flavor. The Greek Mediterranean Diet can play a big role in promoting a healthier lifestyle.” Indeed, with the Mediterranean diet eating well has never been so tasty.

The Hellenic Caucus isn’t the only group that recognizes how special Mediterranean eating is. UNESCO listed The Greek Diet as an “intangible cultural heritage of humanity” in 2010 stating it needed to be recognized “as a great contribution to the World, for the population’s health, quality of life and well-being.”

Conclusion:

There’s no question that Greece has been through some rough times—but there may well be a light at the end of the tunnel. The Bank of Greece, World Economic Forum, and European Union Eurostat seem to agree. If the young culinary-mind Grecians have anything to say about it, there certainly will be. As a proponent of Greek eating, and a proud Greek American myself, I’m thrilled they’ve started to benefit from all the greatness provided by the Greek Diet—and not just healthfully!

Originally feature in the Pappas Post 

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Greek Salad with Chocolatehttp://stellametsovas.com/httpstellametsovas-comgreek-salad-chocolate/ http://stellametsovas.com/httpstellametsovas-comgreek-salad-chocolate/#comments Fri, 15 Aug 2014 17:35:28 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5079 Greek Salad with Chocolate 

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Greek Salad with Chocolate 

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Greek Salad with Chocolate (VIDEO)http://stellametsovas.com/greek-salad-chocolate/ http://stellametsovas.com/greek-salad-chocolate/#comments Fri, 15 Aug 2014 16:29:04 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5069 I love easy Greek recipes.  Not only are they my go-to when life can get hectic, they’re bursting with those flavors and nutrients I keep talking about. The culinary innovations taking place in Greece right now shocked me beyond belief.  Next week I’ll publish an article on what fascinated me most about the entrepreneurial spirit Greeks have collected […]

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I love easy Greek recipes.  Not only are they my go-to when life can get hectic, they’re bursting with those flavors and nutrients I keep talking about.

The culinary innovations taking place in Greece right now shocked me beyond belief.  Next week I’ll publish an article on what fascinated me most about the entrepreneurial spirit Greeks have collected through their recent hardships.

Tomatoes always come to my mind when I think of summer.  Doesn’t matter where I’m at, Greece or the United States, a Greek salad is a must during the warm, sun-soaked days of summer.

Enjoy~

Stella

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Greek Yogurt Recipes: The Sundae (VIDEO)http://stellametsovas.com/greek-yogurt-sundaes/ http://stellametsovas.com/greek-yogurt-sundaes/#comments Fri, 01 Aug 2014 16:01:22 +0000 http://stellametsovas.com/?p=5047 You know me, I’m always thinking of ways to make unhealthy Westernized foods healthier by using the Mediterranean diet as a template. One rather warm late afternoon, I found myself craving a tiny bit of sweet and the watermelon wasn’t going to cut it.  I instantly thought of my beloved gelato. So then I asked myself: […]

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You know me, I’m always thinking of ways to make unhealthy Westernized foods healthier by using the Mediterranean diet as a template.

One rather warm late afternoon, I found myself craving a tiny bit of sweet and the watermelon wasn’t going to cut it.  I instantly thought of my beloved gelato.

So then I asked myself: why not take a traditional desert like the ‘sundae’ and create its perfect twin, The Greek Yogurt  Sundae!

 

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